GAME: Asteroids (Classic Arcade)

GAME: Asteroids (Classic Arcade)

Here’s another guaranteed time-waster, from your friends at Soundwaves!

The Wiki:

Asteroids is a video arcade game released in 1979 by Atari Inc. It was one of the most popular and influential games of the Golden Age of Arcade Games. Asteroids uses a vector display and a two-dimensional view that wraps around in both screen axes. The player controls a spaceship in an asteroid field which is periodically traversed by flying saucers. The object of the game is to shoot and destroy asteroids and saucers while not colliding with either, or being hit by the saucers’ counter-fire.

Due to the game’s success, a sequel followed in 1980 dubbed Asteroids Deluxe. Similar to the original game, the onscreen objects were tinted blue and a shield that depleted with use replaced the hyperspace feature. In addition, the asteroids rotated, a new enemy dubbed a killer satellite was added to the game, and would break apart into two smaller ships that homed on the player’s position if shot. Also included was a “3-D” monitor surround that glowed in the white-UV light. The ship and asteroids appeared to “float” over this cardboard backdrop. Two more sequels followed this, Space Duel in 1982 and Blasteroids in 1987.

The Killer List of Videogames (KLOV) credits this game as one of the “Top 100 Videogames.” Readers of the KLOV credit it as the seventh most popular game.

Asteroids is a video arcade game released in 1979 by Atari Inc. It was one of the most popular and influential games of the Golden Age of Arcade Games. Asteroids uses a vector display and a two-dimensional view that wraps around in both screen axes. The player controls a spaceship in an asteroid field which is periodically traversed by flying saucers. The object of the game is to shoot and destroy asteroids and saucers while not colliding with either, or being hit by the saucers’ counter-fire.

Due to the game’s success, a sequel followed in 1980 dubbed Asteroids Deluxe. Similar to the original game, the onscreen objects were tinted blue and a shield that depleted with use replaced the hyperspace feature. In addition, the asteroids rotated, a new enemy dubbed a killer satellite was added to the game, and would break apart into two smaller ships that homed on the player’s position if shot. Also included was a “3-D” monitor surround that glowed in the white-UV light. The ship and asteroids appeared to “float” over this cardboard backdrop. Two more sequels followed this, Space Duel in 1982 and Blasteroids in 1987.

The Killer List of Videogames (KLOV) credits this game as one of the “Top 100 Videogames.” Readers of the KLOV credit it as the seventh most popular game.

 

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